Displaying items by tag: ttouch
Tuesday, 16 April 2013 11:28

Tellington TTouch Body Wraps

buynowThe body wrap is a piece of equipment commonly used in Tellington TTouch. Generally we would use the American elasticated Ace wrap available from Xtra Dog. The wrap will change the posture of the dog due feedback received from the nervous system. It will help the nervous system be more effective.

 Click Here to Find Out More About Tellington TTouch Offered By Xtra Dog

The wrap should not be put on tightly as the dog should be aware of it without effecting his movement, nor should it restrict the dog in any way. If the dog appears uncomfortable or worried about the wrap then it should immediately be taken off. Do not use a body wrap unsupervised, and it does not need to be on for longer than 20 minutes as a time. Like any new piece of equipment build up the time that the dog has its wrap on, starting with just a couple of minutes. The nervous system can often be aware of the wrap long after it has been removed.

Changing the dog’s posture will change the behaviour of the dog but sometimes wraps can only have a minor effect so do have realistic expectations. A wrap can also influence the dog’s movement so can be a useful tool with a very pulley dog as it will give the dog better body awareness and help them to walk in their natural balance.

Wraps along with Thundershirt (www.thundershirt.xtradog.com) can also help with environmental situations like noise i.e. fireworks, thunder, lawnmowers etc.. They can also help with touch-sensitive dogs.

 

How to Introduce a Dog to Wearing a Wrap

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1.    Put treats onto the wrap and allow the dog to eat of the wrap and sniff it (what we call the dinner plate technique)

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2.    Lay wrap loosely over the dog’s shoulders and ask the dog to move.

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3.    Put it across the dog’s chest and ask the dog to move.

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 4.    Tie the wrap off as a quarter wrap and move the dog again.

You may need to take the wrap off between these steps and move the dog or give him some treats if it becomes too much.

A wrap is used for sensation, not for support like a bandage.

 

Tying a Quarter Wrap

Put your wrap about a third of the way to the middle across the chest of the dog keeping the short end over the middle of the dog’s back. Cross your wrap pver your dog’s back and take the longer end under his tummy and tie it. You can also use a safety pin.

 

Tying a Half Wrap

Place the middle of your wrap across the chest of your dog. Cross the wrap over the shoulder. Bring the ends across the rib cage and then under the dog’s tummy and then at the middle of the back. Tie the ends off or use a safety pin. The back loop can be moved back to rest over the base of the tail if necessary.

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  Click Here To Order a Wrap

 Click Here to Find Out More About Tellington TTouch Offered By Xtra Dog

 

 Chekout this video, where Tellington TTouch practitioner Janet Finlay demonstrates how to use a TTouch body wrap.

 

 

Published in TTouch


This video shows some simple Tellington TTouch earwork techniques that can help your dog if he / she is getting alarmed by noise, thunder, fireworks and bangs.  It can also help stop dog doing into shock if done fast. Earwork combined with using Thundershirts can help to make this a less stressful time for your 4-legged friends. Click here to find out more about Thundershirts.

Published in TTouch
Thursday, 11 October 2012 08:18

The Outdoor Show Season Closes This Weekend

This weekend is the closing of the outdoor show season ... Don't Miss All About Dogs at the Newark Robin Hood Game and County Show

                                       

We are getting ready to go to Newark this weekend for the Robin Hood Game and Country Show at the Newark and Notts Showground. 

Dogs are a major part of the show! Being a major part of the family entitles your dog to a special day out every so often, where other doggie people (and their dogs) can meet and have some fun joining in a host of activities especially designed for our four-legged friends.

That's why there is the All About Dogs Zone to this years Robin Hood Game and  Country Shows!! 

Xtra Dog will have attending over 30 shows this year. with just 3 more remianing - At some of the events we will have special guests who will include TTouch practitioner Marie Miller, Toni Shelbourne, Shona Moon and Janet Finlay, Tellington TTouch instructor Tina Constance, APDT member Kerri Bee, Dog Trainer Hannah Wilkinson (seen on TV's Blue Peter), NSARDA Search and Rescue Dogs, Siberian Husky Club welfare Dogs amongst others. On our stands you will have the opportunity of speaking to our team who will be there to offer free dog advice, as well as being able to buy the range of Xtra Dog products. Come along to have your dog professionally fitted for a harness or a Thundershirt. Also bring your dog along and let us do some training with him/her. Click Here to see our full Event List for 2012.

 

Click read more to see photos of our special guests in 2011

 

Published in News Archive

Our Next Event - Robin Hood Game and Country Show - Ipswich October 6-7chris-mancini

We are getting ready to go to Ipswich next weekend for the Robin Hood Game and Country Show at the Suffolk Showground. We are very excited to be welcoming as our special guest Chris Mancini from the Association of Pet Dog Trainers who will be doing a main arena demo and will be with us to offer dog training advice. Also Alex Wilson and Hannah Wilkinson, student Tellington TTouch practitioners will be on hand to talk about TTouch and how it can benefit your dog, so do drop by and see us, we will be in the All About Dogs Zone.

The following weekend we will be at the Robin Hood Game and Country Show in Newark with special guest Marie Miller who will be concluding her 2012 tour of demos at this show. Marie will also be with us on both days to give dog advice and talk to visitors about Tellington TTouch.

 Xtra Dog will be attending over 30 shows this year. At some of the events we will have special guests who will include TTouch practitioner Marie Miller, Toni Shelbourne, Shona Moon and Janet Finlay, Tellington TTouch instructor Tina Constance, APDT member Kerri Bee, Dog Trainer Hannah Wilkinson (seen on TV's Blue Peter), NSARDA Search and Rescue Dogs, Siberian Husky Club welfare Dogs amongst others. On our stands you will have the opportunity of speaking to our team who will be there to offer free dog advice, as well as being able to buy the range of Xtra Dog products. Come along to have your dog professionally fitted for a harness or a Thundershirt. Also bring your dog along and let us do some training with him/her. Click Here to see our full Event List for 2012.

 

Click read more to see photos of our special guests in 2011

 

Published in News Archive



trailer2Our Next Event - Midland Game Fair 15-16 September

The Midland Game Fair is one of the UK's largest country events, and closed the formal game fair season. Taking place in Western Park Shropshire it has everything for those interested in countrylife and country pursuits. With 3 arena it is an event not to miss. Xtra Dog will be on the main arena so do pop over and see us. The Midland Game Fair is a dog friendly event and our team will be able to offer free dog advice and help with issues like anxiety and leash pulling.

Come and see our full range of products in our new state of the art exhibition trailer (designed by Giles Smith) find out more about Tellington TTouch as we will be promoting this amazing training technique at the show. 

 Xtra Dog will be attending over 30 shows this year. At some of the events we will have special guests who will include TTouch practitioner Marie Miller, Toni Shelbourne, Shona Moon and Janet Finlay, Tellington TTouch instructor Tina Constance, APDT member Kerri Bee, Dog Trainer Hannah Wilkinson (seen on TV's Blue Peter), NSARDA Search and Rescue Dogs, Siberian Husky Club welfare Dogs amongst others. On our stands you will have the opportunity of speaking to our team who will be there to offer free dog advice, as well as being able to buy the range of Xtra Dog products. Come along to have your dog professionally fitted for a harness or a Thundershirt. Also bring your dog along and let us do some training with him/her. Click Here to see our full Event List for 2012.

 

Click read more to see photos of our special guests in 2011

 

Published in News Archive
Wednesday, 13 June 2012 08:46

Xtra Dog Live Goes to Sussex

xtradogliveOur Next Event -  Sussex Game and Country Fair at Parham House, near Arundel west Sussex, with special guest Jenni Robertson from Tellington TTouch Training. Please note the organisers have confirmed it is definately going ahead.

A family home since 1577, Parham Park provides a most appropriate setting for a true family event, which includes superb family features alongside the traditional field sports activities.  Parham’s well-preserved cliff faces provide an impressive backdrop for this country lifestyle showcase.

Parham Park is a well-liked location for steam, stationary engines and vintage vehicles and this year they will build upon this longstanding connection to incorporate a complete vintage section including working demonstrations of wood sawing, stationary engines, classic cars and all the artefacts associated with traditional engines.

Come to our tent and as well as seeing our full range of products including the award winning The Orginal Raised Pet Beds and the Pet Top (new for 2012) find out more about Tellington TTouch as we will be promoting this amazing training technique at the show. Practitioner Jenni Robertson will be on hand to offer advice and show you how it can help your dog. If you have a pulling dog then ask us to show you how to balance him using TTouch groundwork techniques, a double-ended lead and a harness. We will also be able to offer free advice on many aspects of dog management and training. See you at the show.

 Xtra Dog will be attending over 30 shows this year. At some of the events we will have special guests who will include TTouch practitioner Marie Miller, Toni Shelbourne, Shona Moon and Janet Finlay, Tellington TTouch instructor Tina Constance, APDT member Kerri Bee, Dog Trainer Hannah Wilkinson (seen on TV's Blue Peter), NSARDA Search and Rescue Dogs, Siberian Husky Club welfare Dogs amongst others. On our stands you will have the opportunity of speaking to our team who will be there to offer free dog advice, as well as being able to buy the range of Xtra Dog products. Come along to have your dog professionally fitted for a harness or a Thundershirt. Also bring your dog along and let us do some training with him/her. Click Here to see our full Event List for 2012.

 

Click read more to see photos of our special guests in 2011

 

Published in News Archive
Friday, 16 March 2012 10:48

Sarah Fisher's Tellington TTouch Lecture

Last year at Discover Dogs Tellington TTouch instructor Sarah Fisher presented a one hour lecture about TTouch and how tension and stress can effect dogs, If you did not get to see Sarah's lecture we are delighted to be able to give you the opportunity to watch the full lecture. This is a very informative video and we recommend that all dog owners should watch it.

Xtra Dog offers a full range of Tellington TTouch products including harnesses suitable for groundwork, Thundershirts, calming bands etc. Click here to checkout our TTouch range

Published in TTouch

Sarah Fisher Who brought Tellington TTouch to the UK, over 17 years ago, and who is the first Tellington TTouch Instructor in the UK, last year gave a lecture at Discover Dogs at Earls Court in London. Dog World filmed the lecture and it is now on You Tube. Click the link and watch her lecture. It is a great way to find out a little about how Tellington TTouch is such an amazing way to work with dogs. 

Published in News Archive

Tellington TTouch practitioner Janet Finlay who is also a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers UK (no.01046) looks at the 5 things that she most likes about Tellington TTouch

 

janetJanet Finlay, TTouch practitionerTTouch is a gentle and effective training method that uses a combination of bodywork, wraps and groundwork to change a dog's behaviour. There are many things I love about it, as a way of working with animals, but these are my top five:

Its ETHOS: TTouch starts from a position of respect for the animals we work with. We do TTouch for dogs, not to them. The way we work lets the dog know that we are listening to it: we constantly observe the dog's response and adjust what we do accordingly. If the dog is uncomfortable with something that we try, we move back to a point that was accepted. We are aiming always to enable the dog to be the best it is capable of being, and we recognise that the animals we work with are the very best teachers we can have.

It's EASY TO LEARN. Anyone can learn some basic TTouch to help their dog and some of the most powerful tools it provides, are among the simplest to learn. For example, TTouch ear work can reduce shock, induce relaxation, and lower the respiratory rate, and the "Zigzag" slide is great for refocusing over-stimulated or "stuck" dogs. Yet both are touches that can be learned in minutes and done anywhere.

It EMPOWERS owners, equipping them with tools they can use on a daily basis, at home and out in the world, to help their dog. Simply doing regular TTouch helps develop a stronger bond between owner and dog, and relaxes both. This gives a firm foundation for training new behaviours and making progress.

It ENABLES dogs to move forward, to learn, to focus. It releases physical tensions in the body, reducing reactivity and increasing calm. It gives them greater self-awareness and self-control and allows them to experience alternative ways of responding to situations. Whether they have "issues" or not, TTouch helps dogs to develop confidence and fulfil their potential.

It's EFFECTIVE. It is not that it works in the same way for every dog – it is certainly not a one-size fits-all "magic wand" for all canine problems. But I have yet to meet a dog that was not helped to some degree by something from the TTouch "toolkit". Sometimes the effect is dramatic: putting on a wrap, for instance, can completely change a dog's physical and emotional response – for example, a previously reactive dog may voluntarily lie down and relax. Sometimes the effect is more gradual, for instance where a dog that was previously sensitive to touch, slowly becomes more accepting of being handled. But whether the results are immediate or develop over time, or the changes dramatic or gradual, the bottom line is that TTouch works!

 

 

Janet Finlay is a TTouch Companion Animal Practitioner 2 and a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (01046). She lives in Cardiff with her partner and her two dogs, Jake, a Smooth Collie, and Mirri, a Lurcher. To find out more about Janet Finlay's work or to book onto one of her workshops, visit her website http://www.canineconfidence.com/

To read more about Tellington TTouch visit  http://www.xtradog.com/ttouch-for-your-dog.html or visit www.ttouch-tteam.co.uk

 

Published in TTouch
Thursday, 01 December 2011 10:53

Six Reasons To Use A Harness? by Janet Finlay

These days there is an almost overwhelming choice of equipment available, all claiming to help us walk our dogs easily and safely. Tellington TTouch practitioner Janet Finlay who is also a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers UK (no.01046) looks at the benefits of using harnesses.

 

looselead-walking-2-286x300A wealth of different designs of collars, head collars, and harnesses. All have their proponents who feel theirs is the right tool to help you train your dog not to pull on the lead. So how do you decide what is the best for you and your dog?

As a TTouch practitioner I always want to choose equipment that will help the dog to succeed, so I start teaching loose lead walking by fitting a good harness – one that doesn’t tighten on the dog and that has at least chest and back attachments – together with a double-ended lead.

This may seem counter-intuitive. After all, anyone who has seen a team of huskies, knows that dogs can pull pretty hard into a harness. But it is also the best tool I know to stop a dog pulling. Here are six reasons why.


1. It takes pressure off the neck.

A dog pulling into a collar around the neck pulls himself off balance and he therefore has to use you (pulling back against him) to balance himself. Pressure on the neck also restricts breathing, reducing the oxygen that reaches the brain, increasing anxiety and reactivity and reducing the ability to learn. Not to mention the risk of physical damage to the neck and spine and to the soft tissue in the throat from pulling hard into a collar. So the first thing we need to do if we want to teach a dog to walk on a loose lead is to get that pressure off his neck! A good harness means that we can take all pressure off the neck, connecting instead to the chest and/or back.

2. It allows two points of connection.
When you attach the lead to one point on the dog, when the lead tightens, the dog’s opposition reflex will mean that he pulls into it. This is the case whether the attachment is to the collar or the back of the harness, which is why attaching to the back of the harness only, encourages a dog to pull. When a dog has not yet learned to walk on a loose lead, the lead will tighten simply because his natural pace is faster than ours. But a good harness has at least two connection points, one on the chest and the other on the back, and we can connect to each of these with either end of a double-ended lead. Then, if one end of the lead tightens, we can meet that pressure and then release it, while taking up the other connection. Alternating between connections in this way means that there is nothing for the dog to pull against and the opposition reflex is not triggered.

3. It positions the dog naturally at your side.
If you want your dog to walk on a loose lead, the ideal place for it to be is beside you, matching your pace and direction. Attaching a lead to a collar or the back of a harness, positions you firmly behind the dog – in the perfect position to encourage pulling! But when you add that front connection to the harness, with two points of connection, the dog moves naturally to be positioned with his shoulder at your side. This is a much more comfortable position to walk in and does not encourage pulling, which brings us to our next point.

4. It is more comfortable for your dog.
Harnesses distribute any pressure across a much larger and less sensitive body area in the chest and flank, than the alternatives where pressure is concentrated in the neck or face. A well-fitted harness is therefore more comfortable for your dog than being led by a collar or wearing a head-collar. Combined with two points of connection, a fixed harness does not put unpleasant pressure on the dog, which makes the dog more relaxed and therefore less likely to pull. Note: harnesses that tighten on the dog work by creating an unpleasant sensation when the dog pulls, which is not comfortable and not recommended.

5. It gives you better influence and communication.
Two points of connection on a harness give you much more influence on your dog’s behaviour than a single point, and it increases your ability to communicate what you want to your dog. It can be helpful to think of the connection at the back as yourtwo-points-of-contact-231x300 “brake” and the front connection as your “steering”. If you want your dog to slow down, a gentle lift upwards (rather than backwards) on the back connection, will slow your dog without unbalancing him or triggering the opposition reflex. Direction can be communicated very clearly using the connection at the front. This allows you to use the lead gently to reinforce your verbal communication, as a cue or a signal, rather than a correction.

6. It encourages your dog to walk in balance.
Ultimately, to set your dog up to succeed in learning to walk on a loose lead, he first needs to learn to walk in his own balance, without leaning his weight against you through the lead. As we have seen, using a single point of contact on a collar works against this and encourages the dog to pull forward, putting the dog (and you!) out of balance. But using a harness with points of connection on the chest and back, encourages the dog to move his centre of gravity backwards so he is more balanced. And a dog that is physically balanced will also have better emotional balance and will therefore be better able to learn.

Once he is in that balanced position beside you, you can start to reinforce the non-pulling behaviour you want. Select what you want to reinforce – the lead being loose, your dog being in a particular position at your side – and use a clicker to mark that behaviour. You will find that it happens much more naturally and frequently using a harness in this way and he will be able to learn quickly and easily, because you have set him up to succeed. Tomorrow I will talk in more detail about the particular harnesses that work best for this.

So that is why I like to work with harnesses but what about you? Do you use harnesses? Or do you have another approach to loose lead walking that you like better? Let me know in the comments section.

 

Janet Finlay is a TTouch Companion Animal Practitioner 2 and a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (01046). She lives in Cardiff with her partner and her two dogs, Jake, a Smooth Collie, and Mirri, a Lurcher. website http://www.canineconfidence.com


Checkout the Xtra Dog harnesses and TTouch harnesses, ideal for this work both recommended by Janet Finlay 

XtraDog Fleece Walking Harness

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"Designed by TTouch Practitioner Marie Miller, this is a fleece-lined harness with both front and rear rings, designed with a short cross-over back piece to keep the back connection just behind the shoulder on the dog. The neck is a single piece that goes over the dog’s head, with clips to attach it round the dogs body. It is a very comfortable harness with webbing over wide fleece. As such it is particularly recommended for thin coated breeds like sighthounds, and those with skin condition, though is suitable for all breeds. It is only adjustable at the body straps but this harness comes in 11 standard sizes, with a made-to-measure service as well, so you can get a good fit. It also comes in a huge range of lovely colours, including high visibility – and with matching double-ended leads – so is perfect for the fashion conscious!"


TTouch Harness 

cookie-cutout"Designed by TTouch instructor Sarah Fisher, this is an H-style harness with front and back connection rings. The back piece is shorter than most H-style harnesses, keeping the connection further forward to balance the dog and discourage pulling. Both the neck and body straps can be unclipped, so this is a great design for those dogs that don’t like things going over their heads. The harness is very adjustable, allowing adjustments on either side of the neck, on either side of the body and on the chest, and it comes in three sizes, so can fit most dogs comfortably. It comes in green and black webbing."

 



"I use these harnesses regularly with my own dogs and with clients and can highly recommend them. Whichever one of these harnesses you choose,  you won’t go far wrong!"

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